Tag: Utah

Territorial Militia Card Index Online

A card from the Territorial militia records index.
A card from the Territorial militia records index.

The Utah Territorial Militia Records document the administration and activities of various segments of the territorial militia, also known as the Nauvoo Legion. They were brought together by archives staff in the late 1950s and early 1960s in an effort to collect all documents about Utah veterans from any source and to serve as a state repository for those documents.

The Military Records Center acquired the documents from the late 1950s into the early 1960s, rearranging and grouping them by document type, date, and/or military district. Indexes were prepared for most of the correspondence, but plans to index all documents were never completed. These card indexes were later microfilmed and provided one of the primary ways to access these records, even with partial coverage. That microfilm has now been digitized and posted online with full text searching of the typed name information.

Top Baby Names in Utah 1909 Edition

Birth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics in 1909 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images may be accessed from archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/81443.htm.

And that means it’s time to see the most popular baby names that were given in 1909 (see 1905, 1906, 1907, and 1908).

All girl names with larger sizes for most popular.

Girls

  1. Mary
  2. Ruth
  3. Helen
  4. Alice
  5. Dorothy
  6. Florence
  7. Margaret
  8. Edna
  9. Ethel
  10. Grace
All boy names with larger sizes for most popular.

Boys

  1. William
  2. John
  3. James
  4. George
  5. Joseph
  6. Charles
  7. Harold
  8. Robert
  9. Thomas
  10. Clarence

1909 Birth Certificates Available in Online Name Index

Manfred Martin Murray, born March 29, 1909.

Birth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics in 1909 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images may be accessed from the Utah Birth Certificate Index. As all birth certificates at least 100 years old are public, browse 1910-1915 online.

In addition to identity and proof of citizenship, the registration of births assists with monitoring public health issues and the programs created to alleviate them. The original permanent records were transferred from Vital Records to the Utah State Archives and Records Service in 2006, prompted by the Inspection of Vital Records Act passed in 1998 making historical records public. The name index is a collaborative effort of the staff of Vital Records,  volunteers and staff of the State Archives, and includes the child’s full name, parents’ full names, date of birth, sex and county.

The Utah State Digital Archives provides over a million images of historical records online and free to the public, including death certificates from 1904-1961. With worldwide online access, patrons have the ability to do research from anywhere while the State Archives efficiently fulfills its mission “to provide quality access to public information.”

Historic Utah Administrative Code Online

Utah Administrative Code, 1987
Utah Administrative Code, 1987

Eight volumes from 1987 and 1989 of the Utah Administrative Code are now online. The Utah Administrative Code is the complete compilation of state administrative rules. Administrative rules are laws affecting the legal rights and privileges of the public or other governmental entities, and have all the effects of a statute enacted by the Legislature. Each compilation includes only those rules in effect at the time of publication: new rules are added and obsolete rules omitted as necessary.

The Utah Administrative Code was digitized under the direction of the Division of Administrative Rules by the University of Utah. Copies in PDF for downloading will also be available from the division’s web site, along with the most up-to-date current Administrative Code. If you find this resource useful, please be sure to let us know!

Top Baby Names in Utah 1908 Edition

Birth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics in 1908 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images may be accessed from archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/81443.htm.

Two little babies sitting on the grass, each wearing caps and warm jumpers
Photo: State Library Queensland

And that means it’s time to see the most popular baby names that were given in 1908 (see 1905, 1906, and 1907).

1908 Girls
All girl names with larger sizes for most popular.

Girls

  1. Mary
  2. Ruth
  3. Helen
  4. Alice
  5. Margaret
  6. Edna
  7. Florence
  8. Thelma
  9. Dorothy
  10. Grace
1908 Boys
All boy names with larger sizes for most popular.

Boys

  1. John
  2. William
  3. George
  4. James
  5. Joseph
  6. Charles
  7. Robert
  8. Thomas
  9. Harold
  10. Arthur

Also, it is interesting to consider the names of the mothers and fathers bestowing these names. Many seem similar, though the popularity shifts over generations. Perhaps reflecting that the parents could have been born in a range of years, the variety of names is larger and the most popular are much more popular (for example, 844 for mothers named Mary compared to 183 daughters).

Mothers of babies born in 1908

  1. Mary
  2. Alice
  3. Margaret
  4. Florence
  5. Anna
  6. Sarah
  7. Edith
  8. Elizabeth
  9. Annie
  10. Emma

Fathers of babies born in 1908

  1. John
  2. William
  3. Joseph
  4. James
  5. George
  6. Charles
  7. Thomas
  8. Frank
  9. Henry
  10. David

 

 

Top Baby Names in Utah 1907 Edition

It’s time to update and compare the most popular baby names, as found in birth certificates that are now public.

Girls

  1. Mary
  2. Alice
  3. Helen
  4. Edna
  5. Florence
  6. Thelma
  7. Ruth
  8. Margaret
  9. Grace
  10. Mildred

Boys

  1. John
  2. William
  3. James
  4. George
  5. Joseph
  6. Charles
  7. Arthur
  8. Thomas
  9. Clarence
  10. Robert

Newly Processed: December 2014

Juab Co. LetterheadAll public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of December 2014:

Newly Processed: October and November 2014

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the months of October-November 2014:

Book of The Pioneers Celebrating 1897 Jubilee Now Online

Book of the Pioneers

The 116-year-old “Book of the Pioneers” is now available with a full-text search on Utah State Archives web site at archives.utah.gov/digital/14107.htm. The Archives collaborated with the University of Utah J. Willard Marriott Library for conservation and repair of the one-of-a-kind book. In addition, the library created high-quality digital images for viewing online.

The “Book of the Pioneers” is “a record of those who arrived in the Valley of the Great Salt Lake during the year 1847; including the names, ages, autographs and places of residence of all known survivors on July 24, 1897.” The Semi-Centennial Commission compiled the book in two volumes for the Pioneer Jubilee of 1897, in order to document and memorialize the pioneers of 1847. The members of the commission were appointed by the State of Utah’s first governor, Heber M. Wells, who spoke on the subject in his first address to the Utah State Legislature on January 8, 1896, a mere four days after statehood was granted.

The names of men and women who came in 1847 are recorded along with 727 questionnaires answered in their own hand by those still alive fifty years later, creating a “work unique in character and of universal interest.”

Territorial Executive Papers Online

The organic act passed by the U.S. Congress on September 9, 1850 created an office of territorial secretary with three major functions:

(1) To record and preserve all laws and proceedings of the Legislative Assembly (2) To record all acts and proceedings of the Governor in his executive department (3) To provide copies of these official acts to specific federal officials

The EXECUTIVE PAPERS are really part of a larger record keeping system maintained by the Executive Department of the territorial government. Most of the individual documents filed in the series are those that were sent to the Governor or the Secretary requesting or supporting some official action; copies of the actual pardon, appointment notice, requisition, or other “official act”; or copies of documents which reflect actions taken directly by the Governor, such as messages to the Territorial Assembly and proclamations.

Territorial Secretary