Category Archives: News

SLC School Children’s Constitution and Flag Monument Books Now Available Online

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Just in time for back to school season, the Utah State Archives is pleased to make available a fascinating collection of student-created records through our online Digital Archives. These 1932-1952 school children’s Constitution and Flag Monument books were compiled by the Salt Lake City School District to document and commemorate the erection of the School Children’s Constitution and Flag Monument on the west side of Washington Square (in front of the Salt Lake City and County Building). The monument was completed in 1937 and included a flag pole with a sculpture of two children with the United States Constitution standing at the base, and one of the children pointing up toward the flag. School children donated money to fund the monument and local children acted as models for the sculpture.

In 1936 each school in the city compiled a list of students and what occupation each aspired to when they grew up. These lists were sealed in a time capsule in the monument when it was dedicated in 1937. The books in this series were compiled after the time capsule was opened in 1952. They include copies of newspaper articles about the erection of the monument and photographs of the dedication in 1937 and the opening of the time capsule in 1952. They also contain documentation of efforts to erect a flag pole not only at the City and County Building, but at each school in the district as well.


Newly Processed: July 2016

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of July 2016:


Newly Processed: May 2016

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of May 2016:


More Salt Lake City Tax Assessment Books Online

Tax Assessment book from Salt Lake City. The "duplicate" is an entirely handwritten copy of the year's assessment.

Tax Assessment book from Salt Lake City. The “duplicate” is an entirely handwritten copy of the year’s assessment.

Additional books for Salt Lake City tax assessment from 1879 to 1892, after which this function moved to county offices, are now online. These volumes record the assessment of real and personal property Salt Lake City, Utah Territory. They were used for taxing purposes. Individual city assessors assessed and collected property taxes within municipal boundaries, often recording the details such as the number of horses owned.

Previously, books from 1856 to 1878 were digitized by FamilySearch.

If you are interested in volunteering to help complete a name index of these books, please contact Gina Strack.


Call for Volunteers: Court Index Transcription

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The Utah State Archives is looking for volunteers to transcribe typed and some handwritten court indexes to add to the main Name Indexes. Work may be done at the Archives or at home. May include civil cases, criminal cases, or probate for various counties since 1850.

Visit Project for Court Indexes for more information!


Territorial Militia Card Index Online

A card from the Territorial militia records index.

A card from the Territorial militia records index.

The Utah Territorial Militia Records document the administration and activities of various segments of the territorial militia, also known as the Nauvoo Legion. They were brought together by archives staff in the late 1950s and early 1960s in an effort to collect all documents about Utah veterans from any source and to serve as a state repository for those documents.

The Military Records Center acquired the documents from the late 1950s into the early 1960s, rearranging and grouping them by document type, date, and/or military district. Indexes were prepared for most of the correspondence, but plans to index all documents were never completed. These card indexes were later microfilmed and provided one of the primary ways to access these records, even with partial coverage. That microfilm has now been digitized and posted online with full text searching of the typed name information.


Death Certificates for 1965 Indexed by Name

1965 death certificate books 150ppiResearchers may now search for death certificates by name for 1965. Thanks to our volunteers and staff, one may look for a death record by name, date, or county.

The death certificate collection was first released online in December 2006, covering 1904-1956 through a partnership with FamilySearch.  Since then, the Utah State Archives has added more years when they become public 50 years after the date of death. This may be done initially with browsing by county and date, similar to traditional research on microfilm. The final goal is always to be able to search by name and retrieve for free a digital copy of the death certificate record. The Archives updates the index continually based on comments and suggestions from users, ensuring that it is complete and accurate.


Newly Processed: April 2016

By The original uploader was Pitamakan at English Wikipedia [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

Ogden High School via Wikimedia Commons

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of April 2016:


Newly Processed: March 2016

By Erica Lyon (email) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Ben Lomond High School via Wikimedia Commons

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of March 2016:


Military Records Section

“Only by full help of the public can Utah’s warriors be honored.”
– Joan Geyer, Tribune

In the midst of World War II on September 12, 1942, Governor Maw issued a proclamation creating the Department of War History and Archives within the Utah State Historical Society. A call was issued to all citizens to help document the military service of all veterans in Utah within this new office, along with copies of records from the U.S. Selective Service and various military branches. In 1957, the Utah State Archives was officially created within the Utah State Historical Society. One of its first tasks was to register the graves of all veterans buried in Utah.

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Photograph from “A Man With a Grave Task” July 16, 1950, The Salt Lake Tribune

The man in charge of this registration was Robert W. Inscore. A World War II veteran, he was also the son, grandson, and great-grandson of Utah war veterans. In a 1950 Salt Lake Tribune article, he described himself as a “connoisseur of graveyards.” He combed through graveyards up and down Utah, from well-tended to severely overgrown. Along with uncovering headstones, he came across poison ivy, hornets, and one angry rattlesnake. Working with Mrs. Lee Eire, information was gathered from city directories and other sources, he would then write or call upon families to confirm details.

In addition to the compiled data on Utah veterans (now available online), Inscore also assisted families with the process of obtaining the free grave markers or headstones for veterans who perished either in service or following honorable discharge. Today, extensive correspondence survives in the thousands of pages documenting inquires to other states (for previous or subsequent military service), individuals and families, and various offices and branches of the Federal government (Series 17529). By 1959, it was reported in the Utah Historical Quarterly that over 250,000 separate records had been filed on the project. Inscore worked at this task until 1965, possibly fulfilling his promise to the Tribune’s reporter fifteen years previous that “[if] this job ever gets routine, I’ll quit it.” Ultimately Inscore left behind a legacy of valuable hard-won information on thousands of Utah veterans.

Do you have relatives with military service who lived in Utah? Consult these research guides to find out more information on finding records compiled for or created by the Military Records Section.


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