Author Archives: Gina Strack

About Gina Strack

Processing & Reference Archivist at the Utah State Archives.

1906 Birth Certificates Available in Online Name Index

Birth CertificatesBirth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics in 1905 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images may be accessed from

In addition to identity and proof of citizenship, the registration of births assists with monitoring public health issues and the programs created to alleviate them. The original permanent records were transferred from Vital Records to the Utah State Archives and Records Service in 2006, prompted by the Inspection of Vital Records Act passed in 1998 making historical records public. The name index is a collaborative effort of the staff of Vital Records,  volunteers and staff of the State Archives, and includes the child’s full name, parents’ full names, date of birth, sex and county. FamilySearch captured digital images of the original paper records.

The Utah State Digital Archives provides close to a million images of historical records online and free to the public, including death certificates from 1904-1961. With worldwide online access, patrons have the ability to do research from anywhere while the State Archives efficiently fulfills its mission “to provide quality access to public information.”

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at or through family history centers in 132 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Newly Processed: February 2013

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of February 2013:

Department of Natural Resources. Geological Survey

Lieutenant Governor

Salt Lake City (Utah) Water Commission

District Court (Eighth District : Uintah County)

Territorial Executive Papers Online

The organic act passed by the U.S. Congress on September 9, 1850 created an office of territorial secretary with three major functions:

(1) To record and preserve all laws and proceedings of the Legislative Assembly (2) To record all acts and proceedings of the Governor in his executive department (3) To provide copies of these official acts to specific federal officials

The EXECUTIVE PAPERS are really part of a larger record keeping system maintained by the Executive Department of the territorial government. Most of the individual documents filed in the series are those that were sent to the Governor or the Secretary requesting or supporting some official action; copies of the actual pardon, appointment notice, requisition, or other “official act”; or copies of documents which reflect actions taken directly by the Governor, such as messages to the Territorial Assembly and proclamations.

Territorial Secretary

Records from Territorial Governors Online

Governor Young’s Special Election Proclamation

Recordkeeping was not quite the same for governors during the territorial period (1850-1895), compared to more recent years with offices full of staff to keep track of correspondence, photographs, and artifacts. The Archives does have a few things in its holdings to provide insight into territorial governance, which are now going online as part of the Utah Territory Project.

Governor (1850-1857: Young)

Governor (1880-1886: Murray)

Governor (1889-1893: Thomas)

Legislative Publications

Legislative Research

Legislative publications available in the Research Center

As the 2013 session of the Legislature gets underway, we’d like to highlight some relevant publications that have been updated recently.

It’s always best to start with the Research Guide, such as Legislative History or Legislative Records Overview.

The Unannotated Code is the complete, codified law statutes reflecting changes in the most recent session. It has been published since 1982, when it was recognized that the full annotated code was getting unwieldy just to check what the “law of the land” was for a certain year.

The Utah Code Annotated is, however, immensely valuable when it comes to research in the legislative process and how bills turn into law (and sometimes even the intent of the legislation). Unlike other records and publications that are produced by government agencies and preserved by the Utah State Archives, this publication represents the work of editors experienced with legal research,  and is purchased for the use of research and future historical context. Supplements and replacement (“pocket parts”) are released a couple times a year.

Administrative Rules are created by agencies of the state’s executive branch and are enacted as laws under regulatory authority granted by the Legislature or the state Constitution. In short, the Legislature has created a method by which Executive branch agencies can codify their own policies and procedures and give them the force of law. Like the Utah Code, the Administrative Code is compiled with authorization by editors and published for the use of legal research. The most up-to-date information on rules is always found at

Holiday Closure: Martin Luther King Jr. Day

0938 Dover Spot -  Books

The Research Center will be closed Monday, January 21, 2013 in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. It will open once again Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 9 a.m.

2012 in review

The stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 6,100 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 10 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

Holiday Closures: Christmas and New Year’s Day

Beehive illustration (Dover spot 1008)The Research Center for the Utah State Archives and Utah State History will be closed Tuesday, December 25, 2012 for Christmas Day. It will re-open Wednesday, December 26 at 9 a.m.

We will also be closed Tuesday, January 1, 2013 for New Year’s Day.

Website Update

UPDATE: This has been postponed a couple of weeks. Most pages (and bookmarks) will not be affected when that time comes, though we always welcome feedback if something breaks or is particularly hard to find.

The website at will be moving to a new server on December 1, 2012. Please be patient as we find and fix any broken links and finish moving content over the next few days.

If you are unable to find some information on researching at the Utah State Archives, please feel free to contact the Research Center for some help, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The phone number is (801) 533-3535 or you may use email.

Holiday Closure: Thanksgiving

Have a wonderful and safe Thanksgiving!

The Research Center will be closed Thursday, November 22, 2012 for Thanksgiving. Normal hours will resume Friday, November 23, 2012.


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