Author Archives: Gina Strack

About Gina Strack

Processing & Reference Archivist at the Utah State Archives.

1907 Birth Certificates Available in Online Name Index

Birth CertificatesBirth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics in 1907 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images may be accessed from archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/81443.htm.

In addition to identity and proof of citizenship, the registration of births assists with monitoring public health issues and the programs created to alleviate them. The original permanent records were transferred from Vital Records to the Utah State Archives and Records Service in 2006, prompted by the Inspection of Vital Records Act passed in 1998 making historical records public. The name index is a collaborative effort of the staff of Vital Records,  volunteers and staff of the State Archives, and includes the child’s full name, parents’ full names, date of birth, sex and county. FamilySearch captured digital images of the original paper records.

The Utah State Digital Archives provides over a million images of historical records online and free to the public, including death certificates from 1904-1961. With worldwide online access, patrons have the ability to do research from anywhere while the State Archives efficiently fulfills its mission “to provide quality access to public information.”

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


Top Baby Names in Utah 1907 Edition

It’s time to update and compare the most popular baby names, as found in birth certificates that are now public.

Girls

  1. Mary
  2. Alice
  3. Helen
  4. Edna
  5. Florence
  6. Thelma
  7. Ruth
  8. Margaret
  9. Grace
  10. Mildred

Boys

  1. John
  2. William
  3. James
  4. George
  5. Joseph
  6. Charles
  7. Arthur
  8. Thomas
  9. Clarence
  10. Robert

Newly Processed: December 2014

Juab Co. LetterheadAll public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of December 2014:


Newly Processed: October and November 2014

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the months of October-November 2014:


Holiday Closure: Veterans Day

John Walter Holbrook

The Research Center will be closed Tuesday, November 11, 2014 in honor of Veterans Day. It will open again at the usual time of 9 a.m. on Wednesday, November 12, 2014.

Did you know the Utah State Archives has many resources on military service records? Check out these Research Guides:

The U.S. National Archives also have a lot of information on records generated by all the military branches, including how to obtain individual service records.


Research Center Closed Friday

Book and Lamp (Dover Spot 0307)The Research Center will be closed Friday, October 25 to allow staff to attend training. It will open again Monday, October 28 at 9 a.m.


Archives Month: Ann Torrence on U.S. Highway 89

All Events for Utah Archives Month | RSVP on Facebook | Get Directions

Thursday, October 24 at Noon

Ann Torrence - Highway 89

U.S. Highway 89: The Scenic Route to Seven Western National Parks

U.S. Highway 89: The Scenic Route to Seven Western National Parks is a visual guide to seven of America’s favorite national parks, hometown events and quirky roadside attractions linked by U.S. 89. Scenic Highway 89 traces the stories of legendary trappers, missionaries and homesteaders. Widened in the Roaring Twenties to satisfy America’s motoring enthusiasts, but bypassed by modern interstates, the 1,600 mile route from Canada to Mexico retains its back-roads charm. From Yellowstone to the Grand Canyon, beauty queens to working cowboys, Ann Torrence’s stunning images and engaging text capture the enduring spirit of the west.

Writer and photographer, Ann Torrence drove over 15,000 miles to research and photograph U.S. Highway 89. Her documentary style explores the interplay of the human element and landscape; transformations of culture–what is kept, lost, and reinvented; and the iconography of the American West.

Following Ann’s remarks, staff of the Utah State Archives will provide a public demonstration of the new Highway 89 Digital Collections online initiative. This project is designed to gather and document the prized historical collections from various institutions throughout the region, all of which detail the important history that has happened along Highway 89.

 


Archives Month: 25th Street Confidential by Val Holley

All Events for Utah Archives Month | RSVP on Facebook | Get Directions

Monday, October 21 at Noon

Val Holley - 25th Street

Buy the Book

25th Street Confidential traces Ogden’s transformation from quiet hamlet to chaotic transcontinental railroad junction as waves of non-Mormon fortune seekers swelled the city’s population. The street’s outsized role in Ogden annals illuminates larger themes in Utah and U.S. history. Most significantly, 25th Street was a crucible of Mormon-Gentile conflict, especially after the non-Mormon Liberal Party deprived its rival, the People’s Party, of long-standing control of Ogden’s municipal government in 1889. In the early twentieth-century the street was targeted in statewide Progressive Era reform efforts, and during Prohibition it would come to epitomize the futility of liquor abatement programs.

This first full-length treatment of Ogden’s rowdiest road spotlights larger-than-life figures whose careers were entwined with the street: Mayor Harman Ward Peery, who unabashedly filled the city treasury with fees and fines from vicious establishments; Belle London, the most successful madam in Utah history; and Rosetta Ducinnie Davie, the heiress to London’s legacy who became a celebrity on the street, in the courts, and in the press. Material from previously unexploited archives and more than one hundred historic photos enrich this narrative of a turbulent but unforgettable street.


Newly Processed: September 2013 [Updated]

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of September 2013:

Cedar City (Utah)

District Court (First District)

Heber City (Utah)

Holden (Utah)

Kanab (Utah)

Kanosh (Utah)

Kingston (Utah)

La Verkin (Utah)

Levan (Utah)

Liberty Cemetery Maintenance District (Utah)

Minersville (Utah)

Nephi (Utah). Sexton

Orderville (Utah)

Payson (Utah)

Riverside Cemetery Maintenance District (Utah)

Tremonton (Utah)

Uintah County Cemeteries Department (Utah)

Warren-West Warren Cemetery Maintenance District (Utah)

Edited to add three series that were missed:

Division of Health

Ogden (Utah). City Recorder

Tremonton (Utah)

Laketown Cemetery Maintenance District (Utah)


Browse Death Certificates Online, 1962

Although fully searchable name indexes are not yet available for all the latest death certificates, we are now able to offer digital images online that may be browsed by date and county, similar to the process when visiting the Research Center.

Narrow results by choosing both year and county. Within a folder, certificates are chronological by date.

Links will also be added to the series inventory. Death certificates become public 50 years after the date of the death.


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