Tag Archives: digital

1906 Birth Certificates Available in Online Name Index

Birth CertificatesBirth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics in 1905 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images may be accessed from archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/81443.htm.

In addition to identity and proof of citizenship, the registration of births assists with monitoring public health issues and the programs created to alleviate them. The original permanent records were transferred from Vital Records to the Utah State Archives and Records Service in 2006, prompted by the Inspection of Vital Records Act passed in 1998 making historical records public. The name index is a collaborative effort of the staff of Vital Records,  volunteers and staff of the State Archives, and includes the child’s full name, parents’ full names, date of birth, sex and county. FamilySearch captured digital images of the original paper records.

The Utah State Digital Archives provides close to a million images of historical records online and free to the public, including death certificates from 1904-1961. With worldwide online access, patrons have the ability to do research from anywhere while the State Archives efficiently fulfills its mission “to provide quality access to public information.”

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through family history centers in 132 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


21st Amendment Ratification Records Online

Did you know that Utah was the state that fulfilled the constitutional requirement to ratify the 21st amendment to end prohibition? This amendment is also the only one thus far ratified by state conventions rather than state legislatures [Wikipedia]. The records of the Convention to Ratify the 21st Amendment for Utah are now online.

The 72nd Congress of the United States proposed the 21st amendment to the U.S. Constitution, repealing the 18th amendment and once again legalizing the manufacture and use of liquor. On October 10, 1933, Governor Henry H. Blood called for the election of delegates to a constitutional convention for the purpose of ratifying or rejecting the 21st amendment. The election was held on November 7, and the elected delegates met December 5. The amendment became effective with the ratification of 36 states; Utah was the 36th state to ratify. These records document the activities of the convention.

Convention to Ratify the 21st Amendment (1933)


Governor Huntsman Press Releases Online

This series contains press releases and media advisories from the office of Governor Jon Huntsman given to media sources to publicize the governor’s activities and opinions. The records contain information on the appointment of judges and state officials, announcements of new businesses in Utah, legislative announcements and official decrees recognizing and celebrating significant individuals and events.

The documents online are searchable by keyword.


Dept. of Transportation Photograph Index Online

The Community Relations Office of the Department of Transportation created an index to their official photographs. The office assigned a job number to each set of photographs taken or adopted by the office as official photographs. The job number provides access to all photographic material in the official photographs collection. Job numbers include a three-part number series. For each job number the index minimally identifies the subject of the photos and the date or dates on which they were taken.

The photographs that indexed here number in the hundreds of thousands–a true treasure unexpectedly found within government records. Find an interesting job in the index? Visit the Research Center to access the photographs from some of these series:


Earliest Utah Birth Certificates Free Online

Birth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics beginning in 1905 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images created in partnership with FamilySearch may be accessed from archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/81443.htm.

In addition to identity and proof of citizenship, the registration of births assists with monitoring public health issues and the programs created to alleviate them. The original permanent records were transferred from Vital Records to the Utah State Archives and Records Service in 2006, prompted by the Inspection of Vital Records Act passed in 1998 making historical records public. The name index is a collaborative effort of the staff of Vital Records and volunteers and staff of the State Archives, and includes the child’s full name, parents’ full names, and date of birth, sex and county. FamilySearch captured digital images of the original paper records and plans to publish both the images and index at FamilySearch.org. Subsequent years of historical certificates are currently being indexed, and in the meantime may be accessed in the Research Center of the Utah State Archives and Utah State History.

“Many stories emerge from these births registered over a century ago,” says Gina Strack, an archivist with the Utah State Archives. “A couple originally from Japan, for example, registered the birth of not only their son in 1905 (though born in early 1904), but also a set of twins just born. According to death certificates also online however, the twins would both die within the year.” (More about this story)

The Utah State Digital Archives provides over half a million images of historical records online and free to the public, including death certificates from 1904-1959. With worldwide online access, patrons have the ability to do research from anywhere while the State Archives efficiently fulfills its mission “to provide quality access to public information.”

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


Indian War Service Affidavits Online

The Indian War Service Affidavits from the Commissioner of Indian War Records is now online. In 1909 the legislature passed a law creating a Board of Commissioners of Indian War Records. Their duties were to ascertain the names of the persons who were members of any organization performing military duties during Indian wars or expeditions against the Indians during territorial years. Veterans completed affidavits of service; two witnesses also completed affidavits supporting the facts. The affidavits were then filed in the office of the chairman of the board, the Adjutant General of the State.

The soldier’s affidavit consists of a preprinted form with blanks for the name of the county in which he was making his oath, the individual’s name, his residence, length of residence, age, date of enrollment, type of company (infantry, cavalry, etc.), his captain, residence at the time, age at the time, length of service, transfer dates and type of company served in following transfer with its captain’s name up to the final organization served with, and date of release. Then there is space for the description of duties and engagements participated in while in each company. The witnesses are named and an oath taken that the information provided was accurate. If the soldier was deceased, the widow or a child could complete a similar affidavit. The accompanying two witness affidavits reiterated the information with an oath that in the belief of the witnesses, the service rendered by the soldier was “honest and faithful.”

FamilySearch created digital images from the original paper records and Utah State Archives staff Rod Swaner matched the images to an existing name index.

Related records (not online):


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