Tag Archives: births

Browse Birth Certificates Online: 1912

Birth Certificate, 1906

Birth certificate images for 1912 are now online at archives.utah.gov/digital/81443.htm. Although they are not indexed by name yet, if one knows the birth date and county it should not be difficult to locate the correct folder and browse through a few images for the time being. Saving and printing of images is available.

Would you like to help index birth certificates? Or other records? Join our team of volunteers for a rewarding experience handling, describing, or making accessible original records from throughout Utah’s history. Read more about our Volunteer Program.


1906 Birth Certificates Available in Online Name Index

Birth CertificatesBirth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics in 1905 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images may be accessed from archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/81443.htm.

In addition to identity and proof of citizenship, the registration of births assists with monitoring public health issues and the programs created to alleviate them. The original permanent records were transferred from Vital Records to the Utah State Archives and Records Service in 2006, prompted by the Inspection of Vital Records Act passed in 1998 making historical records public. The name index is a collaborative effort of the staff of Vital Records,  volunteers and staff of the State Archives, and includes the child’s full name, parents’ full names, date of birth, sex and county. FamilySearch captured digital images of the original paper records.

The Utah State Digital Archives provides close to a million images of historical records online and free to the public, including death certificates from 1904-1961. With worldwide online access, patrons have the ability to do research from anywhere while the State Archives efficiently fulfills its mission “to provide quality access to public information.”

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through family history centers in 132 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


Browse Birth Certificates Online: 1911

Birth Certificate, 1906

Birth certificate images for 1911 are now online at archives.utah.gov/digital/81443.htm. Although they are not indexed by name yet, if one knows the birth date and county it should not be difficult to locate the correct folder and browse through a few images for the time being. Saving and printing of images is available.

Would you like to help index birth certificates? Or other records? Join our team of volunteers for a rewarding experience handling, describing, or making accessible original records from throughout Utah’s history. Read more about our Volunteer Program.


Top Baby Names in Utah 1906 Edition

It’s time to update and compare the most popular baby names, as found in birth certificates that are now public. A few shuffled around, but the #1 are the same as the year before (view 1905 top names)

Boys

  1. John
  2. William
  3. James
  4. George
  5. Joseph
  6. Charles
  7. Frank
  8. Robert
  9. Edward
  10. Harold

Girls

  1. Mary
  2. Alice
  3. Florence
  4. Ruth
  5. Thelma
  6. Helen
  7. Edna
  8. Dorothy
  9. Edith
  10. Mildred

Browse Birth Certificates Online: 1909-1910

As an update to an earlier post, birth certificate images for 1909 and 1910 are now online at archives.utah.gov/digital/81443.htm. Although they are not indexed by name yet, if one knows the birth date and county it should not be difficult to locate the correct location and browse through a few dozen images in chronological order for the time being.


Browse Birth Certificates Online, 1906-1908

Although fully searchable name indexes are not yet available for all birth certificates, we are now able to offer digital images online that may be browsed by date and county, similar to the process when visiting the Research Center.

Narrow results by choosing both year and county. Within a folder, certificates are chronological by date.

Links will also be added to the series inventory.

*1911 will be held until January to ensure limited access to certificates less than 100 years old.


Earliest Utah Birth Certificates Free Online

Birth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics beginning in 1905 are now online and freely available to the public. The searchable index and digital images created in partnership with FamilySearch may be accessed from archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/81443.htm.

In addition to identity and proof of citizenship, the registration of births assists with monitoring public health issues and the programs created to alleviate them. The original permanent records were transferred from Vital Records to the Utah State Archives and Records Service in 2006, prompted by the Inspection of Vital Records Act passed in 1998 making historical records public. The name index is a collaborative effort of the staff of Vital Records and volunteers and staff of the State Archives, and includes the child’s full name, parents’ full names, and date of birth, sex and county. FamilySearch captured digital images of the original paper records and plans to publish both the images and index at FamilySearch.org. Subsequent years of historical certificates are currently being indexed, and in the meantime may be accessed in the Research Center of the Utah State Archives and Utah State History.

“Many stories emerge from these births registered over a century ago,” says Gina Strack, an archivist with the Utah State Archives. “A couple originally from Japan, for example, registered the birth of not only their son in 1905 (though born in early 1904), but also a set of twins just born. According to death certificates also online however, the twins would both die within the year.” (More about this story)

The Utah State Digital Archives provides over half a million images of historical records online and free to the public, including death certificates from 1904-1959. With worldwide online access, patrons have the ability to do research from anywhere while the State Archives efficiently fulfills its mission “to provide quality access to public information.”

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


Newly Processed: November 2010

All public records at the Utah State Archives are accessible through the Research Center. However, once processed the records are easier to use with proper storage and fuller descriptions, including online series inventories. The following list includes record series that were processed during the month of November 2010:

District Court (Second District : Weber County)

Provo City School District (Utah)

Public Service Commission

Sanpete County (Utah) County Clerk


Sanpete Birth Register Online

The birth register maintained by the Sanpete County Clerk from 1898-1905 is now available as a book online. These records contain birth registers recorded from 1898 through 1905. Each entry includes an assigned number, sex, color, race, date and place of birth, parent’s names and residence, attending physician , and remarks.

Beginning in 1898, physicians and midwives were required to keep record of each birth for which they assisted. In their absence, the parents were required to complete a report. They then reported quarterly to the county clerk or in the case of incorporated cities, to the local board of health and they would in turn report to the county clerk (Revised Statutes of Utah 1898, Title 57, p. 474-475).

In 1905, the state passed a law requiring each county to file a uniform certificate with the State Bureau of Vital Statistics.


Beginnings and Endings: The Family of Frank and Iku Arima

The birth certificates of three different children from one set of parents in one year is liable to catch one’s attention. It turned out that in July 1905, when Frank and Iku Arima filed for birth certificates for twins Estella and Orville born July 18, 1905, they also filed for their first son, Clarence, born February 8, 1904.

Birth Certificate for Estella Arima (Utah State Archives Series 81443)

Birth Certificate for Orville Arima (Utah State Archives Series 81443)

Birth Certificate for Clarence Arima (Utah State Archives Series 81443)

Further research revealed more about this family. According to documents available on Ancestry.com, Frank Arima immigrated from Japan in 1891 (Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920, Rexburg, Madison, Idaho) while his wife Iku is listed on the ship Indrapura in Portland, Oregon arriving December 30, 1902. (Oregon Passenger and Crew Lists, 1888-1957).

Frank is listed in the Salt Lake City R.L. Polk Directories as a cook at Harry Murata (1903) and Fort Douglas (1904).

Sadly, the family would be interacting with the Office of Vital Records and Statistics once again, but this time to register the deaths of the twins born in 1905. On September 29, 1905 Estella died of cholera and on December 30, 1905 Orville (written as Orbear) died of “convulsions,” two and five months old, respectively. They are buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.

Death Certificate for Estella Arima (Utah State Archives Series 81448)

Death Certificate for Orbear (Orville) Arima (Utah State Archives Series 81448)

Clarence Arima would go on to apply for a U.S. passport in 1925 while a student for a trip to Japan. The application even includes a presumed photograph of Frank and Iku’s remaining son.

Clarence Arima (Ancestry.com. U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925)

Iku Arima died in Los Angeles, California in November 1967 (Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index).

How did this family exemplify the Japanese immigrant experience? Perhaps Estella and Orville were, as speculated in the article “Japanese Life in Utah” the first Nisei born in Utah.  These documents provide a bit more to that story, but there is always more to learn about people in the past.


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